by Robert W.  Patterson

This article was first published at WashingtonExaminer.com on April 27, 2011.

Third of a three-part series

It may be unfair to indict the political class for lack of nerve in addressing family breakdown.

Even as the retreat from family life became pronounced among the low-income population and has devastated the poor, Congress deep-sixed Aid to Families with Dependent Children in 1996 in hope of reversing the rise in out-of-wedlock births among African Americans that had raised the Irish ire of Daniel Patrick Moynihan 30 years before. (more…)

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

The Family Medical Leave Act of 1993 was inspired by the desire to help mothers manage working and family emergencies. Like many well-intentioned laws, the FMLA has been plagued by unintended consequences and expensive abuses, especially costly for small businesses. Like many bureaucratic programs, it has been abused by people who are savvy enough to scam the rules. Free negotiation by workers and firms potentially could provide a superior solution to the problems the FMLA was supposed to solve. (more…)

by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

Published at ToTheSource.org November 26, 2008 and October 14, 2004.

Apparently, Western secularism pulled from its traditional roots cannot.

We cannot sustain ourselves economically because the Western democracies are committing financial suicide with federal spending and entitlement programs that they then push off onto future generations instead of paying today. (more…)

by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

“It Takes a Village to Raise a Child,” was Hillary Clinton’s Big Idea in the 1990s. Hillary’s supporters and detractors alike regard that slogan as a thinly-veiled code for increasing the government’s responsibility for the care of children. The demographic decline of Europe illustrates what would happen if we took this Village-Raising-Children image seriously. (more…)

by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

The title of Patricia Morgan’s new book, The War Between the State and the Family, says it all. The British government has engaged in “systematic discrimination against (married) couples in the tax and benefit system.” This persuasive book, published by the Institute of Economic Affairs in the UK, provides a cautionary tale about “deconstructing” the family into a mere collection of individuals. In so doing, Patricia Morgan provides an illustration of the principles of Catholic social teaching laid out in Leo’s 1891 letter, Rerum Novarum. (more…)

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