by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

The Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty prepared for The Fifth Annual World Meeting of Families sponsored by The Pontifical Council on the Family July 5, 2006, Valencia, Spain

(Publication Information: Familia et Vita, Anno XI, No.3/2006-1/2007 (Special double issue) Congresso Internazionale Teologico-Pastorale, Pontificium Consilisum Pro Familia)

“In July 2006, I was one a few Americans invited to give a paper at the Fifth World Meeting of Families, sponsored by the Pontifical Council on the Family, in Valencia Spain. The text of that paper has recently been published in a special conference issue of the journal Familia et Vita. I can’t honestly recommend you purchase the whole volume, unless you are fluent in Spanish, Italian and French! The Meeting was a truly international gathering, with clergy and laity from the entire Catholic world. My own contribution, entitled “The Church’s Response to the Socialist Attack on the Family,” is reprinted here.” (more…)

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

This article was first published in the Acton Institute’s July/August 1995 issue.

By now most readers of this journal are familiar with arguments that the charitable impulse is not well-served by institutions of the modern welfare state. Indeed, many are persuaded that the modern state feeds itself from the fount of charitable feelings that have been created by the Judeo-Christian tradition. The state, by exploiting this ethos, has created a situation in which people feel more like suckers than Samaritans. In this article, I will argue that the economic significance of the Western religious traditions extends far beyond the creation of an ethic of sharing or neighborly charity. (more…)

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

This article was originally published in the Acton Institute’s November and December 1994 issue.

The starting point for most discussions of women’s issues is the observation that women earn less money than men, with income equality as the implicit touchstone for the desirability of policies, personal or public. But defining one’s well-being in terms of one’s income is not self-evidently correct. In fact, it is extremely problematic to argue that one’s income is an accurate measure of one’s wealth, even on strictly economic grounds. (more…)

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